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Every day an estimated 123 million people are using the Internet for all kinds of business including banking, paying bills, shopping, research, and entertainment. Some of the most popular sites include Ebay.com, AOL.com, MSN.com, Yahoo.com, Myspace.com, Craigslist.org, and Amazon.com.
The majority of people on the Internet are using it to research new products. If you’re not competitive in this market you are missing a significant opportunity! According to TrueLocal.com, 25-60 percent of people are searching the Internet for businesses and services in their community, with Spas and Health Clubs being top search categories. Is your spa/skin care center on the Internet, are you exploiting this new market growth?

Let us take a look at this scenario: you have decided to get laser hair removal. You first visit Spa A, which promises to give you six treatments – all for the incredible price of $99 and the offer is only valid if the first treatment is done immediately. Next, you visit Spa Z, where a consultation visit is scheduled first. During this consultation, possible treatment times are provided based on your propensity to burn and heal, the technician advises you of the effectiveness of the procedure in regards to your skin type, walks you through the common after effects, tests an area of your skin for any reaction, and then schedules you for your first appointment to come back in for treatment.
Which spa would you choose to do business with? Spa Z would be the better choice since they would take the time to make you feel comfortable and to explain the treatment so you understand how long it could take to achieve results and what to expect when you get home.

The advent of medical spas has brought forth new issues related to risk management and insurance in general. The usual suspects include property and liability coverage, with the added wrinkle of professional liability or “malpractice” coverage. Further, no two medical spas seem to be quite the same—as such, each spa will need a customized insurance program to ensure that all exposures have been properly covered.
Insuring your new medical spa shouldn’t create a major headache, but there are a number of critical factors to consider. Let’s build an insurance program from the ground up.

Professional liability (also known as “malpractice” or “errors & omissions”) insurance covers you and your business against lawsuits arising out of your professional services. While this coverage is readily available, not all policies are created equal. In order to provide adequate coverage, a policy must be designed to cover the unique operations of an aesthetic or spa business.
This special type of insurance coverage can protect against a wide range of allegations including allergic reactions to products used during treatments, all manners of skin irritations and inflammations, burns from hot wax and steam wands, sexual misconduct, etc.

At the onset of a design or re-design of your skin care facility you may want to assess or reassess your vulnerability to Mother Nature. It is a very real threat accompanied by the fear of loss of income, loss of wages, workplace disruptions, structural damage, and sometimes injuries and even death. What is a business owner to do? What is an employee to do? How do you plan for such disastrous scenarios?
Many spas and salons are caught off guard when destructive weather takes power lines down and damages their businesses to the point of not being able to work at all.

Continuing education is a vital part of career growth in the aesthetic industry as well as the growth of every spa business. Educational classes are now being offered online, making it easier than ever to continue learning on your own schedule. You can even use your smartphone to access many online offerings! Countless companies are offering continuing education online as an innovative, educational program with an array of different resources. Online education is a new, convenient method to deliver what skin care professionals need. Any professional can now take classes on their own schedules while still maintaining a business. Continuously learn in order to stay up-to-date and keep business on top!

Continuing education is often thought of as the minimum hours required by a state in order to maintain an aesthetics’ license. While this is a great way to keep up on the latest trends and technologies, some states do not require continuing education hours and the term can mean so much more. Whether or not your state requires continuing education hours, continual self-development is imperative to staying at the top of the field and there are many resources available to obtain this education – no matter which state you live in. Always be sure to adhere to the requirements for your state, but consider what else you can do to continue your development above the minimum requirement.

When young aestheticians start out in their new journey, the opportunities are endless as to the direction of their career. At first, newly licensed aestheticians are eager to begin their careers and experience the fulfillment of her learning. As their careers progress over time, these aestheticians will discover what they love most about their field and may choose to pursue extensive schooling in one aspect of the field. When deciding to change career direction, these aestheticians have various avenues that can be chosen. 
Aestheticians may choose to specialize in a specific area such as hair removal or spa services like body wraps or hydrotherapy. Most aestheticians enjoy the cosmetic field and may choose to specialize in makeup artistry. With makeup artistry, there are numerous avenues for the aesthetician to specialize in, such as permanent makeup or makeup for film and photography. Pursuing a career as a makeup artist will require additional training that will broaden the range of career opportunities, as well as offer the ability to work as a freelance makeup artist.

Aesthetics has come a long way in the United States since licensed professionals had to spell aesthetics for those who asked “what do you do?” Clients know what aesthetic services are now, and many have placed them firmly into their lifestyle must-haves. Due to this popularity, aesthetic schools are filled with students excited to join our profession, and committed aestheticians graduate with the fundamentals for practicing basic skin care. But is this basic education enough? Our services and our businesses have become more complex and many believe require higher levels of education for the safety of our clients and to just stay in business.

Each of us has the potential to become more as a skin health professional than our license could ever reflect. As clinicians, we have the unique opportunity to change the way a person thinks about themselves — to help improve their self-image and self-esteem. Whether specializing in relaxing facials, makeup application, hair removal services or chemical peels, we all have the ability to make someone feel better about themself. Many facilities offer these treatments; therefore, the true value of the services you provide comes from you and the level of expertise you bring.

Second quarter results from the Professional Beauty Association's (PBA) Quarterly Distributor Benchmarking Survey are out and highly positive for reporting companies and the industry as a whole. A majority of reporting distributors, which increased since the survey was launched in the first quarter of 2012, reported higher sales, added at least one new line to their portfolio, and increased staff. 
"The PBA Distributor Benchmarking report shows that even in a stagnant economy, professional distribution is dynamic and growing in the beauty industry," said Steve Neumaier, president of Goldwell New York and chair of the PBA task force charged with managing this research effort.

Each of us has the potential to become more as a skin health professional than our license could ever reflect. As clinicians, we have the unique opportunity to change the way a person thinks about themselves — to help improve their self-image and self-esteem. Whether specializing in relaxing facials, makeup application, hair removal services or chemical peels, we all have the ability to make someone feel better about themself. Many facilities offer these treatments; therefore, the true value of the services you provide comes from you and the level of expertise you bring.

Second quarter results from the Professional Beauty Association's (PBA) Quarterly Distributor Benchmarking Survey are out and highly positive for reporting companies and the industry as a whole. A majority of reporting distributors, which increased since the survey was launched in the first quarter of 2012, reported higher sales, added at least one new line to their portfolio, and increased staff.
"The PBA Distributor Benchmarking report shows that even in a stagnant economy, professional distribution is dynamic and growing in the beauty industry," said Steve Neumaier, president of Goldwell New York and chair of the PBA task force charged with managing this research effort.

This article will address the development of a man’s coordination of awareness regarding good skin care and the origins of their belief systems. These systems of accumulated experiences, whether internal or external, support or deter a man’s ability to research, seek out, purchase, utilize, and explore advancements that will improve their visual appearance by engaging in a regimen of consistent proper skin care. So as not to generalize all men as the same, the author supports the hypothesis of central tendency or the middle mass of the bell shape curve when describing average findings for men.

The industry has been abuzz for the last few years about Light Emitting Diodes (LED, also known as Photodynamic Therapy or Light Therapy) for acne clients, but what does it truly mean to the aesthetician in daily practice?
First of all, it is best to understand the terms we talked about above, so that as a professional there is no confusion when talking with manufacturers, other practitioners, as well as in your work environment in relating to your medical or paramedical colleagues.
The term LED refers to the method by which the light is produced for photodynamic therapy.

More than any other profession the field of aesthetics captures what it is to be beautiful.  Being an aesthetician is like living a fantasy in the adult work world. Above all other occupations, it stands alone because it is the only professional arena where if you have the right look, personality, talent and brains you can enter center stage and still be in true character. No illustrious degrees required. All you need is the right fit and the right pathway and you will succeed against all odds.

With all of the growth in the spa industry some of us curious minds are wondering just where all of this is going. Just five years ago, I recall delivering lectures to anxious crowds of newcomers, corporate drop outs, physicians, aestheticians, and spa owners. We discussed trends, tips, and spa management. While many would say that the spa industry is slowing down, I liken it to the restaurant industry with (finally) more leveled, readily measured, and stable growth patterns. For all of the anti-aging remedies and youth-enhancing formulations, the spa industry has grown sea legs and is growing up!

Consumers should not be afraid to make an appointment at a “mediclinical” spa because of complex words like aesthetics, paramedical, and cosmeceutical. These words have one mission in common: consumer relaxation with results. Today’s Mediclinical spa concept is the millennium’s answer to a “one-stop healing shop.”
The American spa industry has grown exponentially in the last two decades and thankfully so. Proudly, I can say I was an aesthetician in the mid-1980s when skin care was just taking off in the United States, before licensing was available, and when the European facial “invasion” was just beginning to take hold. Ladies were coming in to relax and enjoy treatments that offered them pampering and a topic for conversation.

As a spa professional, you want to provide the best possible treatment for your clients. Providing the best treatment is reliant on 50 percent technique and 50 percent product. In aesthetic or massage therapy school, often the emphasis is put more on learning the right technique and less about teaching the basics of natural ingredients and how to select quality products for your business. In turn, once you complete your studies you are left to learn about products from independent research and through suppliers. Unfortunately, the information skin care companies provide to you can in some cases be based on false claims the company is making to sell their product.

Remember your first grade teacher and how kind and wonderful she or he was? Did they teach you how to read, write, or tie your shoe? What makes a particular teacher or instructor stand out? Maybe it wasn’t your first grade teacher that left such an impression. Maybe it was your high school math teacher, your professor in college, or maybe your aesthetics instructor? The very person that taught you the most basic skills for your career impacted you profoundly. The very foundation of your career can be traced back to that sole provider of education and the passion that they imparted into you.

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